How to make a DTG emblem

How to make a printed emblem.

This blog is to explain how we at Northwest Custom Apparel make printed emblems. The advantage of a printed emblem is that it can be made much quicker and offers more detail in the the design.

The first step in the process is to have all the materials necessary to manufacture a printed emblem.

Tools necessary are:

  • Digital Printer (We use the Kornit Hexa)
  • Die Cutting Machine
  • Heat press
  • MG3U merrow machine
  • Sharp Scissors
  • Materials
  • A good solid twill fabric to print the design on.
  • Acceptable art in a eps or 300 dpi jpg format.
  • Heat seal material (5mm or thicker).
  • Fusible backing to make emblem firm for finishing
  • Merrow thread with the correct color

The process is

  • Scan the art and adjust size to meet the emblem requirements
  • Load design into the digital printer
  • Print the design on a sheet of material. You should be able to print 24 emblems per sheet of material.
  • Apply fusible backing to sheet of emblems
  • Cut the emblems to size or use a die cutter with the correct size die.
  • The printed emblem now needs to be finished with a over lock border. This over locked border is achieved using a 3GU merrow machine. The Merrow machine was designed to apply a heavy stitched border to a emblem. This gives the emblem a real sharp finished look.
  • Last step is to apply the heat seal backing. Heat seal material can be purchased at a local fabric store. The application can be done with a steam iron or a heat press machine if you have one.
  • The finished emblem is now ready to be applied to a cap front using a cap heat press.
  • To put a emblem on a cap is very simple. Remove all the loose heat seal backing material and apply heat and pressure for about 25 seconds and then you have a finished product.
  • Trucker emblems are now becoming very popular so good luck.

Author: Jim Mickelson

Jim Mickelson is the pioneer in the custom apparel industry since 1977. Jim is the CEO of NW Custom Apparel and Decosource and writes for industry blogs and trade journals throughout the world. Jim's work has been published in Impressions and Prntwear magazines. Jim is available for onsite consulting services when his schedule permits.